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Moving Out Tips

Moving Out Tips

Moving out of your student property? Here are our top tips to help make sure you have everything sorted! 

End of Tenancy Checklist 

  1. Pay your rent
  2. Redirect your post
  3. Keep your paperwork
  4. Contact phone/internet suppliers
  5. Hand over the keys
  6. Contact utility companies
  7. Clean! 

Pay rent

It is the tenants responsibility to pay rent up until the end of the tenancy agreement even if you move out early! Before you move out make sure you pay any outstanding rent to your agent or Landlord.


Picture: Public Domain Pictures
 

Redirecting Post

If you are getting post to your current student property you will need to make sure you redirect this, especially so you dont miss any important mail. We would suggest doing so for up to 3 months. This can be done through the Royal Mail website. 

After all you don't want all your hard work wasted when your degree certificate ends up with the new tenants! 


Picture: Flickr


Keep Paperwork 

As tempting as it is to throw this all away, we would you suggest you hold on to any paperwork and a copy of the tenancy agreement, at least until the deposit is returned. 


Contact phone/internet providers

You should notify your phone/internet provider that you are vacating the property. Generally contracts are for 12 months, but you should notify as to when this needs to ead otherwise you could be put onto a 'rolling contract' which tends to charge higher rates.


Return your Keys 

All keys should be ready to be returned on (or before) your move out day. Keys should be returned along with information of a forwarding address (where you can be contacted) in case the Landlord or agency need to contact you. 


Picture: americanbuilderscentral.com


Contact utility providers

Similar to the phone/internet providers you will need to notify all utility providers you are vacating the property. We would advise you take photos of your meter readings on the day you move out and submit these to the providers. 


Clean! 

Cleaning at the end of the tenancy isn't easy, especially when you share the space with other students, however making sure the property is clean and tidy will help when it comes to check out and deposit returns. Make sure you plan way ahead of your end of tenancy date to declutter and clean everything before. Especially if you have a lot of rubbish as the Council may not take all of this away on one bin collection day. We would also suggest you plan a rota so each person has tasks to do in the communal areas.


Picture:  Picpedia



Top Tips for cleaning: 

Get set for cleaning success

You’ll have better success and make cleaning jobs easier with preparation. Check that you are stocked up on cleaning supplies and plan the order you are going to do your jobs in. If you are in a group why not set up a cleaning schedule of house chores? Stock up on cloths and brushes– or give your old ones a wash before you start, or you’ll be spreading old dirt around the house. Finally, turn your attention to your vacuum cleaner and empty the bag and replace the filter if it needs doing.


You can use budget ingredients: 
  • white wine vinegar - great for mould and mildrew as well as cleaning windows
  • Vodka - can help to remove stains on carpets and marks on high gloss surfaces
  • Coke - remove rust and built up limescale especially on showers and toilets 
  • shaving foam - helps with carpet stains and the toilet pan.
  • Lemon - great for sinks/draining boards


Cleaning your property: 

  • Start from the top and work down 
  • open windows to air the property 
  • focus on doors, mirrors and skirting boards 
  • clean behind and under the furniture - don't be afraid to move things! 
  • don't forget to clean outside the house too! 
 

Cleaning windows

When it comes to windows, whether you’re cleaning with or without a window vac, the right glass cleaners will make life easier and the results that much brighter. The latest window vacs are designed to make light work of window cleaning. Window vacs can also be used to clear up spills and clean tiles, shower screens and other smooth surfaces around the home. This versatility makes a window vac a great investment all round.

picture: Pixabay

Dealing with dust

Give yourself an easy time to dust down surfaces. Dust can aggravate allergies so it’s well worth a thorough approach, dust the areas you see but also the tops of wardrobes, around door frames and even the ceiling.

Kitchen cleaning

Cleaning surfaces is a daily operation but when it’s time to tackle the bigger jobs, find the right cleaners to give you a sparkling result and ensure that you don’t damage things. Every day grease and grime can be tackled with an antibacterial spray cleaner. Stainless steel products need extra care so for sinks, cookers, and cooker hoods, use a cleaner designed for use on stainless steel to clean, polish and protect it.

picture: www.flickr.com

Descaling

Where there’s soap or water, there’s cleaning to be done. Scale and limestone can build up on appliances, sinks and taps as well as on showers and surrounding tiles. Treat coffee machines, electric kettles and washing machines with a descaling solution or tablets, these can be brought from supermarkets. Scale and limescale deposits mean the heater elements use more energy, which makes them less efficient and often means that the elements wear out. Vinegar is also good for helping to break down limescale (although not as effective as specifically designed solutions) but does leave a lasting smell. You can use a limescale remover on taps, bath tubs, toilets, shower walls and for descaling blocked shower heads.

Mould

In the bathroom, mould can quickly become an issue, so make tackling it part of your big spring clean task list. You can get rid of those black or brown marks found on the silicon seal between the bath and edges of tiles using a mould removal spray. These sprays effectively remove all stains caused by mould, fungus and algae. The damp environment can also make shower curtains go mouldy, but most can be popped in the washing machine for a quick clean.

See our blog on removing mould for more infomation: https://www.leydonlettings.co.uk/articles/how-to-prevent-damp-causes-and-treatment

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